16 | The Jewelry Business Magazine Continued to Pg 41 PROMOTIONS. SALES. EVENTS. You may consider these the most time consuming efforts of your business. Conceiving your next event idea may come easily, with staff brainstorming during a quiet moment in the store. But the execution is a different story. How do you get the right customers to show up? To know about it and to tell their friends? You’ll want to think about your traditional methods, your in- store use of conversation and how your broad-reaching tactics like radio and other broadcast media do their part to raise awareness of the promotion or event. But often, the simplest elements are overlooked, ones that can simplify a multi-channel marketing push. DEVELOPING A SMALL COLLECTION OF CREATIVE ASSETS First, you’ll want to collaborate with your staff. Talk about the “selling points” for the event or promotion. Is your event part of something larger, like a community art fair or sidewalk sale, allowing you to describe both as reasons for attendance? Is it a shop-for-a-cause event, where a percentage of store sales would be matched for a meaningful nonprofit? Really hone the way that your associates will describe the activities of the event to your clientele. While it might seem silly, role play with your team. They will find their words, and you’ll be sure you know just what they are saying. FIND FOUR IMAGES THAT REPRESENT YOUR EVENT These four images aren’t all images of engagement rings. In fact, if you must have inventory in any of them, limit yourself to a single photo. The others should be things that show the emotional experience of the event, your own staff serving a customer, the experience of watching the gift as its given. If you look at the image and have an audible response—that’s the image you should pick. When showing these images or ranking them in order of importance, the order should showcase inventory last, smallest, or least. This might go against what you think is important, but remember, your customers are connecting with you before and at the event. The piece they purchase won’t be decided upon until they are in the store itself. USE WORDS SPARINGLY Pen three text components about the event. First: A 100-140 character statement that describes the event in a single line. Keep it short, but get the emotion into the statement. Some examples might be “Literacy Has a Real Ring To It. Support XYZ cause At Jay’s Jewelers this Saturday” or “Drop In During Sidewalk Sales to Beat the Heat and Make Your Wish List” or “Tuesday Ten Percent: You name the Nonprofit and We Write the Check”. Next: a two sentence description that expands on the statement. And finally: the time and place details. I HAVE MY MATERIALS COLLECTED. NOW WHAT? Now that you’ve collected the materials, you’ll use them in different combinations, in the following places. Hero Image. You know the slider on your home page that probably shows a blend of your inventory items? Take one of the emotional images, and lay the Text Statement over it, headline style. Finish with a softer, smaller listing of the time and Place details. Link it to the next item: a calendar event on your site. Calendar event. If you don’t have a calendar of events, your blog page or where you list newsy items on your website will also work. An emotional image as the thumbnail, with all three text components inside the event listing should work perfectly. Reminder—there’s no need to use your inventory image yet, as the customer is seeing this item on your website, where much of your inventory can already be explored. Blog. This is where the inventory image can go. Is the event a trunk show? Invite your supplier to provide the text! Is this a fundraiser? Ask the nonprofit to pen a blog about the mission of their organization. Remember, the blog needs to also GENERATING TO SUPPORT IN-STORE PROMOTIONS CREATIVE ASSETS By Anne Drummond